Monday, November 14, 2016

On an unexpected topic: the Spanish Inquisition


Catholic Answers provides a discussion here. 

7 comments:

John Moore said...

It looks like he says nobody got burned at the stake during the Spanish Inquisition. Is that right? He wrote, "The autos-da-fe had no torture and no burning."

This would be big news if it were really true. He should put it right at the top, and the headline should say "Nobody got burned in the Spanish Inquisition!"

Ilíon said...

"It looks like he says nobody got burned at the stake during the Spanish Inquisition."

There is a very good chance he's doing the standard dodge -- "It was the *secular* authorities, not The One True Bureaucracy, who burned people at the stake."

But, also, there is another thing to be kept in mind. In many cases, after the collapse of the western Roman Empire, the names of Roman law punishments had been retained, but the content of the punishment had been softened under Christian influence ... somewhat like "life imprisonment" doesn't really mean life imprisonment.

jdhuey said...

I'm a bit perplexed by the article. It claimed to debunk some misinformation typically given about the Spanish InQ, but what he wrote is pretty much the standard story that I've heard all my life. The only thing he soft pedaled was that the main piece of information that they were after with the torture were the names of other people that were secretly practicing Judaism. As pointed out the defendants were already considered guilty because of the evidence against them, but the main evidence against them was the 'confessions' of other victims of torture.

Also, as I understand it, the confiscated wealth was divided up with 1/3 going to the Crown, 1/3 going to the Church in Spain and 1/3 sent on to Rome. It is no stretch of the imagination to surmise that the main motivation for the Inquisition had more to do with money than with religion.

B. Prokop said...

"It is no stretch of the imagination to surmise that the main motivation for the Inquisition had more to do with money than with religion."

Rather like how one generally finds that so-called "religious wars" are really all about economics.

Crude said...

It was the 'secular authorities' because the Spanish Inquisition was largely about protecting Spain from traitors who were feigning their Catholicism in the hopes of being able to stick around and eventually sell the Catholics out to the highest bidder. This thing started right after they had finally kicked the muslims out after a very, very long invasion/occupation. I imagine 'Let's make sure none of these assholes are faking us out this time' was high on the list.

I know, it's a shocking idea: muslim extremists and extremist-sympatico people, skulking into a country in the hopes of betraying it bloodily? What are the odds!

That said, if you ask a typical Cult of Gnu atheist/idiot how many people died in the Inquisition, there's a good chance they'll give answers in the low millions, so a little education on this front helps. (Actually it doesn't, they don't care about facts.)

Edward T. Babinski said...

The Inquisition in Spain or WORLDWIDE? That article only discusses conversos in Spain.

"The Inquisition didn't just take place in Europe, it also took place in the colonial Spanish territories of Mexico and northern Central America. Featuring fifty-eight previously untranslated and unpublished documents from the Holy Office of the Inquisition in New Spain, an indispensable resource for anyone seeking to understand the Inquisition​'s nearly 300 year reign in the New World and the effect it has had on societal development in modern-day Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua"
-- The Inquisition in New Spain, 1536-1820: A Documentary History by John F. Chuchiak IV

"The Inquisition was the most powerful disciplinary institution in the early modern world, responsible for 300,000 trials and over 1.5 million denunciations. Examines the Inquisition's activities in Spain, Italy, Portugal and overseas Iberian colonies." -- The Inquisition: A Global History 1478-1834 (Past and Present Publications) by Francisco Bethencourt

Bonfires of Culture: Franciscans, Indigenous Leaders, and the Inquisition in Early Mexico, 1524–1540 by Patricia Lopes Don

Death by Effigy: A Case from the Mexican Inquisition (The Early Modern Americas) by Luis R. Corteguera

Fire & Song: The Story of Luis de Carvajal and the Mexican Inquisition by Anna Lanyon

The First Prejudice: Religious Tolerance and Intolerance in Early America (Early American Studies) by Chris Beneke

Witch Hunts in the Western World: Persecution and Punishment from the Inquisition through the Salem Trials (Extraordinary World) by Brian A. Pavlac

Sinners on Trial: Jews and Sacrilege after the Reformation Hardcover by Magda Teter

Also of interest THE CRIMINAL HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY, in 10 vols. in German: Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums

And, "Tens of thousands of natives who were kidnapped and enslaved by the conquistadors then forced to descend into the 'mouth of hell' of eighteenth-century silver mines or, later, made to serve as domestics for Mormon settlers and rich Anglos. Builds the incisive case that it was mass slavery, more than epidemics, that decimated Indian populations across North America." -- The Other Slavery: The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America by Andrés Reséndez

Ilíon said...

some intellectually dishonest God-denier (but I repeat myself): "It is no stretch of the imagination to surmise that the main motivation for the Inquisition had more to do with money than with religion."

It's also no stretch of the imaginate to "surmise" that 1+1=5.

The Spanish inquisition was about religion and politics and even morality -- which three topics are reflections of one another. The crudé-minded individual was not so far off when he said, "the Spanish Inquisition was largely about protecting Spain from traitors who were feigning their Catholicism in the hopes of being able to stick around and eventually sell the Catholics out to the highest bidder."

We find it apalling that los reyes Católicos had such a "bigotted" attitude toward non-Catholics ... but *we* live in a society shaped by a 300-year Protestant truce ... which anti-Christians (and not a few Catholics) are working overtime to subvert.