Monday, February 15, 2010

Some atheists offer to take care of raptured Christians' pets

For a fee, of course. HT: Steve Hays.

But do you get a full refund if the atheist converts to Christianity before the Rapture?

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Pathetic. Its obvious to me that this is supposed to be a satire of the Christian faith. Although it claims to be serious, it trys to mock beliefs such as the rapture. Although scripture doesnt lay out exactly what will happen, I doubt our pets will need care & I think every Christian knows this.

Blue Devil Knight said...

Just not funny, and not because I'm offended. I'm all for parody of weird religious beliefs, but this one misses the target.

Doctor Logic said...

Some beliefs deserve to be mocked.

Anonymous said...

"Some beliefs deserve to be mocked."

Agree totally! A few that pop in my head are
-something created from nothing
-fish turning into giraffes
-the philosophy of evolution

Stephen S. said...

What concerns me the most is that there are probably some people out there who actually would buy this sort of 'pet-insurance.'

Steven said...

I'm wondering what it is about a belief in a rapture that deserves being mocked.

I'm not a rapturist myself, but I don't see what is worth mocking.

Perhaps DL just thinks that what makes it worth being mocked is its being a religious belief?

Blue Devil Knight said...

Truly funny parody is not easy, especially of a subpopulation that includes campus preachers screaming at men with long hair that they are going to hell. How do you top those guys?

I brought this up at Steven's blog, but has anyone seen a good documentary on those campus preachers? You know the ones I mean, they stand there yelling at everyone and people stand around laughing or even worse, trying to debate. I wonder what makes those guys tick. What are they like when eating cereal in the morning? Do they scream at the cereal, or is it like an acting gig when they go out to campus.

I find them a fascinating bunch, usually I just assume they are mentally ill but Steven suggested that might not be the best explanation.

Dustin said...

Those campus preachers come to my school from time to time. My favorites are the ones who come with a big sign threatening hell for, among other folks, "pot heads," "rebellious women," "lying homosexuals," "Mormons," and "sports nuts."

Stephen S. said...

For those wondering why 'rapturist" (or dispensationalists) aught to be mocked.

The reason is because most of these people insist on conservative, capitalistic politics, while, on the other hand, insisting that none of what we do on this earth really matters because we (Christians anyway) are going to be whisked away to some far off paradise.

If they were consistent (at least in my opinion)they really should not give a flying you know what about 'worldly' politics.

They, implicitly, deny the goodness of creation. This is why I find this position so problematic. Things we do really do matter.

Steven said...

For those wondering why 'rapturist" (or dispensationalists) aught to be mocked.

The reason is because most of these people insist on conservative, capitalistic politics, while, on the other hand, insisting that none of what we do on this earth really matters because we (Christians anyway) are going to be whisked away to some far off paradise.

If they were consistent (at least in my opinion)they really should not give a flying you know what about 'worldly' politics.

They, implicitly, deny the goodness of creation. This is why I find this position so problematic. Things we do really do matter.


None of that makes it clear to me that they ought to be mocked, let alone aught to be mocked.

Lots of people behave inconsistently with their beliefs--yes, even me.

Martin said...

Every day I get reminded that like "Data" on Star Trek I don't have a real sense of humor.

Example A: Mark Shea posts a video from the Onion on how the government plans to plant little microchips in Schizophrenics heads in order to track them...it goes on for a while in Onion fashion. I was offended and upset but clearly was the exception.

Example B: This post. I fell out of my chair laughing. Although it clearly is meant as ridicule, I thought it was well balanced in the sense that if there were a Rapture and people were safe in heaven looking down on the coming mess they would not be worrying about their pets.

Maybe an MRI would help.

Mark said...

I like this. I don't know if it's "funny," but it's still an extremely clever way of illustrating the cognitive dissonance many religious believers live with. Why do people who profess firm belief that the whole world is going to end soon do less preparing for the Apocalypse than they would for a flood or a hurricane? It suggests that either those people are drastically overestimating their own religious convictions, or religious beliefs are maintained in very different ways than other kinds of belief.